Best of Bhutan

Bhutan

Culture

Travel the breadth of Bhutan, hike to Tiger's Nest and witness a festival

15 days £3,395 pp This is the per person group tour price, based on 2 sharing. The price is subject to change with exchange rate and flight cost fluctuations.
Dates & Prices

Intro

This tour is ideal for those wanting to experience the diversity of Bhutan as you journey from east to west through this Himalayan kingdom. Set off from Guwahati to the India-Bhutan border leaving behind the subtropical climes of Assam and start your climb into Bhutan's mystical mountains. Drive through the remote eastern towns of Trashigang, Trashiyangtse and Mongar, visit group-free monasteries and wander around sleepy villages. Roam the magnificent valleys of Bumthang, perhaps the most picturesque in the country. Meander your way through jaw-dropping mountain passes to Gangtey and Phobjika Valley, home to rare migratory black-necked cranes in the winter. Visit Bhutan's finest dzong in Punakha and get blessed at the Temple of Fertility. Take in museums and experience the vibrant night life in Bhutan's capital Thimphu before ending your journey in Paro with a thrilling trek through blue pine forest up to Tiger's Nest monastery.

TOUR HIGHLIGHTS

  • Visit remote dzongs and Buddhist gompas
  • Enjoy the Black Necked Crane Festival in Phobjika Valley
  • Dense forests, home to diverse flora and fauna
  • Visit the Temple of Fertility in Punakha
  • Bhutanese art & culture in museums of Thimphu
  • Hike up to the iconic Tiger's Nest monastery

Places Visited

Samdrup Jongkhar - Trashigang - Trashiyangtse - Mongar - Bumthang - Gangtey - Trongsa - Phobjikha valley - Punakha - Thimphu - Dochula Pass - Paro

What's Included

Visa for Bhutan
​Arrival and departure transfers
Ground transport with driver
Accommodation
All meals 
English-speaking guide
Entrance fees to sites and parks
Itinerary & Map
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Day 1 : Guwahati - Samdrup Jongkar

Arrive at Guwahati airport (India), where you will be met by a Travel The Unknown representative, and transfer to the southern Bhutanese border town of Samdrup Jongkhar. In the evening, explore the town and local market. Overnight in Samdrup Jongkhar.

Meal plan: Dinner

Bordering Assam (India), Samdrup Jongkhar is a busy town and one the largest in eastern Bhutan. It is very clean (in stark contrast to the more frenetic Indian side), with an eclectic mix of Bhutanese and Indian shops, eateries and hotels. It is a convenient place to stay and stock up on essentials before venturing further into Bhutan. 

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Day 2 : Samdrup Jongkhar - Trashigang

Start driving towards Trashigang. En route, take a short stop at Khaling ('Bird Valley'), which is an enchanting valley filled with songbirds. Here, you will also get the opportunity to experience and explore Bhutanese textile weaving. Continue driving via Kanglung town, which is home of Sherubtse college, one of the famous academic institutes of the Royal University of Bhutan.

On arrival in Trashigang check in to your hotel. In the evening, visit Trashigang Dzong. Overnight in Trashigang.

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

Trashigang Dzong or ‘Fortress of the Auspicious Hill’ was built in 1659 to defend against Tibetan invasions. This imposing fortress is strategically situated high atop a spur overlooking the Dangmechu River. It is said that upon seeing the dzong, invading Tibetan armies remarked that it was not on the ground and called in a 'Sky Dzong' before retreating. The present dzong was enlarged by Dzongpon Dopola in 1936.

Trashigang ('Auspicious Mountain') in eastern Bhutan is a picturesque town with 2,000 inhabitants. It is located above a river and scattered on the steep hills of a wooded mountain. Today, it is the junction of the east-to-west highway and road connecting Samdrup Jongkhar to the Indian state of Assam. The town is also the site of the market place for the semi-nomadic people from Merak and Sakteng whose costumes are unique in Bhutan. Quite off-the-beaten track, Trashigang is also a good base for excursions to Trashiyangtse and other towns and villages in north east Bhutan. 

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Day 3 : Trashigang - Trashiyangtse - Trashigang

After breakfast, visit the temple of Gom Kora, which sits on a small plateau overlooking the river. It is famous because Guru Rinpoche is said to have trapped a demon in a rock here. Continue on to Doksum village, where you can see women weaving and a chain link swing bridge from the 15th century. Next, head up the hills to Trashiyangtse and visit Trashiyangtse Dzong. If time permits, you will also visit the dazzling Chorten Kora on the riverbank below the town. Overnight in Trashigang. 

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

Trashiyangtse is a rapidly growing town that is the administrative centre of its district. Situated in a small river valley, it is a lovely spot from which to take walks into the surrounding countryside. Trashiyangtse is famous for its wooden crafts, particularly containers and bowls.

The Chorten Kora is a dazzling stupa (dome-shaped Buddhist shrine) that is very different from others in Bhutan, as it is modelled on the larger Bodhnath stupa in Nepal. The recreation is based on a carving the Lama made into a radish when he visited Nepal in 1740. Typical of Nepali stupas, it has eyes painted on its four cardinal points. There are two important festivals here: one for the Dakpa community residing in neighbouring Arunachal Pradesh (India), and a second for the eastern Bhutanese. 

The Trashiyangtse Dzong ('Fortress of Auspicious Fortune') is one of the oldest dzongs in Bhutan. The main relic here is the statue of Chuchizey, the 11-faced Bodhisattva of Compassion, which is surrounded by many legends.

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Day 4 : Trashigang - Mongar

Drive to Mongar, visiting Drametse Lhakhang en route. Overnight in Mongar. 

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

Mongar is eastern Bhutan's fastest developing district. It is known for growing the lemongrass plant, which is used in essential oil production. The Mongar Dzong is one of the newest dzongs in the country, yet is built using the same methods and traditions as the others. It is unusual because of its non-strategic location, two entrances and the fact that the monk and administrative bodies share the same courtyard.

Drametse Lhakhang ('Peak Without Enemy') is one of the largest and most important monasteries in eastern Bhutan, deeply associated with the Peling tradition of Buddhism. It was founded by a highly accomplished nun named Choten Zangmo in the 16th century, who was the granddaughter of Terton Pema Lingpa (the famous religious master who discovered treasure in the Burning Lake). This monastery houses a full range of spiritual treasures and other sacred objects and is the source of spiritual inspiration to the people of Drametse and neighbouring communities. 

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Day 5 : Mongar - Bumthang

After breakfast, start driving to Bumthang. This will be one of the most scenic journeys of your trip, as you will cross the Himalayas via the 4,000m-high Thrumshing La pass, where you will see gushing waterfalls, steep cliffs, blazing flowers and constantly changing vegetation. En route, visit the Ura valley, the highest of the four Bumthang valleys, and Membartsho, one of the greatest pilgrimage sites in Bhutan. Overnight in Bumthang.

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

Located in central Bhutan, Bumthang is considered the spiritual heartland of Bhutan. This district is dotted with many temples and monasteries, among which are some of the oldest Buddhist temples and monasteries. This beautiful valley of buckwheat and apples has a mysterious history as an abode of gods and is one of the richest cultural places in the country.

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Day 6 : Bumthang

Full day sightseeing in the stunning Bumthang valley. Visit important monasteries, including Kyichu Lhakhang, Jakar Dzong, Jambay Lhakang and drive across the river to Tamshing Lhakhang. Overnight in Bumthang.

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

The Tamshing Lhakhang monastery is the seat of Lama Sungtrul Rinpoche, the current incarnation of Pema Lingpa (1450–1521), who built it in 1501. He was a famous saint, master of the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism and the discoverer of spiritual treasures. It contains sacred religious scripts and paintings, among which are the portraits of Pema Lingpa himself. 

The Jakar Dzong was originally built in 1549 by Yongzin Ngagi Wangchuk, who came to spread the teachings of the Drukpa Kagyupa order in Bhutan. He saw a  white bird perched on the construction site and considered it a good omen, naming the dzong to mean 'White Bird Fortress'.

The Lhodrak Kharchhu Monastery was founded by Namkhai Nyingpo Rinpoche in 1984 who was recognized at a very young age to be the reincarnation of a Tibetan lama whose spiritual lineage dates back to the nearest disciples of the great 9th century master. Since then, the monastery has developed considerably and increased by almost four hundred monks. The monastery has become part of an extensive effort to preserve and revitalize Tibetan culture. The monks' regular curriculum includes reading, grammar, poetry, memorizing the daily prayers, learning dharma dances, drawing mandalas, learning the melodies of sacred rituals, learning the use of ceremonial instruments and the art of making sacrificial objects, karika, the basics of contemplation and instruction on the different stages of tantra.

The Jambay Lhakhang monastery is one of the oldest in Bhutan. It was built in the 7th century on the orders of Tibetan King Songtsen Gampo. A small paved courtyard in front of the main temple every year hosts the Jambay Lhakhang festival that is very popular with tourists.

The Kyichu Lhakhang temple complex consists of three temples. The first was built in 1652 on the site of the Guru Rinpoche's meditation in the 8th century. The second was built on the site of a cave that contains a most holy rock with the imprint of the Guru's body. The third temple was built in the 1990s by Ashi Kesang, the Queen Mother of the royal family. The three temples are surrounded by a wall that is made of 108 chortens (shrines).

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Day 7 : Bumthang

Full day to explore the valleys and villages of Bumthang. Overnight in Bumthang. 

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

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Day 8 : Bumthang - Trongsa - Gangtey

In the morning, drive to Trongsa across the Yutong La Pass (3,400m). Visit Chumey valley on the way, which is famous for Yathra weaving on wool fabric. In the afternoon, visit Trongsa Dzong. Continue driving to Gangtey via Pele La Pass, visiting Chendbji Chorten en route. Overnight in Gangtey.

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

The Chendbji Chorten is believed to be situated at the point where three ridges and three edges of the sky meet. It is recognisable by its round shape and eyes painted on its sides, which bears similarity to the Jarung Khashor (Bodhanath) stupa in Nepal.

Trongsa is situated on a steep ridge  that drops off into the clouds on its south side. It  offers spectacular views of the deep valleys surrounding it. The various hotels, guesthouses and restaurants all offer stunning views from their balconies. Trongsa Dzong is easily visible from anywhere in town and is always an impressive sight.

The Trongsa Dzong sits overlooking the Mangdechhu River. It was founded by Yingzin Ngagi Wangchuk, a descendant of Ngawang Chogyal and a revered follower of Kuenkhen Pema Karpo. In 1541, he meditated at the village of Yueli in Trongsa, a few kilometers away from the present Dzong. During the meditation, he saw a lit butter lamp below the  Goenkhang  ridge, which houses the guardian deities Palden Lhamo (Mahakali) and Yeshey Goenpo (Mahakali). Considering the place to be sacred, he built mediation quarters. Once during his meditation in the new quarter, the deity Palden Lhamo appeared and prophesied that this place would play an important role in spreading Buddhist teachings. After this incident, Yingzin Ngagi Wangchuk constructed a small temple and named it Mondrupley. Over the years, his disciples built many smaller meditation centers near the Mondrupley temple, which soon began to resemble a small village. The people of Yueli named this new village Trong-sar (new village).

Pele La Pass is the traditional boundary between the east and the west. The pass is marked by large white chorten prayer flags and there is an abrupt change in vegetation at this point, where mountain forest is replaced by dwarf bamboo. Altitude: 3,300m.

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Day 9 : Gangtey - Phobjikha Valley [FESTIVAL]

Today you will drive to Phobjikha valley for the Black Necked Crane Festival. Overnight in Gangtey. 

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

The Gangtey valley is one of the most beautiful spots in Bhutan. Finding such a large flat valley without any trees after climbing through thick forest is extremely rare in Bhutan. Altitude: 3,000m.


Gangtey Gompa is the only Nyingmapa monastery on the western side of the Black Mountain’s Gangtey valley and is also the biggest Nyingmapa monastery in Bhutan. It is perched on a small hill that rises from the valley floor. The monastery is surrounded by a large village inhabited by the families of the 140 Gomchens who take care of the monastery. Gangtey was founded in 1613 by Pema Trinley, the grandson of Pema Lingpa, the famous Nyingmapa saint of Bhutan. Pema Lingpa's religious traditions are still taught there. In later years, the monastery was enlarged and rebuilt in the form of a dzong.

Phobjikha valley is a glacial valley on the western slopes of the Black Mountains.The valley is a designated conservation area and plays host to a flock of endangered black-necked cranes, which migrate here from Tibet each winter. Phobjikha falls under the Wangduephodrang district and lies on the periphery of the Black Mountain National Park. The valley boasts two beautiful meandering rivers, the Nakay Chhu (blackwater) and the Gay Chhu (whitewater). Altitude: 2,900m. 

The Black Necked Crane Festival celebrates the arrival of the endangered birds to Bhutan, where they spend their winters, from the Tibetan Plateau, where they breed. The festival creates awareness of these majestic birds and stresses the importance of their conservation. Celebrations include themed folk songs, masked dances, short plays and singing school children.

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Day 10 : Phobjikha Valley - Punakha

Drive to Punakha, visiting Wangdue on the way. In the evening you will have an excursion to Chimi Lhakhang. Overnight in Punakha.

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

The Chimi Lhakhang temple is commonly known as the Temple of Fertility. It sits on a hillock in the centre of the valley, a site that was blessed by the 'Divine Madman'. This is the maverick saint Drukpa Kuenleyis that was famously obsessed with his 'magic thunderbolt of wisdom'. Therefore it is not unusual to see phalluses (symbol of fertility) painted on the outside of houses! It is widely believed that if couples who do not have children pray at this temple, they are blessed with a child very soon. Besides its fertility blessings, the temple also works to fulfill other religious needs. The trail to the temple leads across rice fields through the tiny settlement of Pana, which means ‘field’. A walk through this village will give you a rare glimpse into the daily life of the Bhutanese.


The Punakha valley has a pleasant climate with warm winters and hot summers. Owing to the favourable climatic conditions, rice grows very well in this region and is the main cash crop cultivated here. Altitude: 1,200m.

Wangdue is one of the largest dzongkhags (districts) in the country that covers 4,308 sq km and ranges from 800-5,800m in altitude. It has extremely varied climatic conditions, ranging from sub-tropical forests in the south to cool and snowy regions in the north.

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Day 11 : Punakha - Thimphu

Visit Punakha Dzong, then drive to Thimphu via the Dochu La Pass. When you arrive in Thimphu in the afternoon, you will go to see King's Memorial Chorten and the Trashichhoe Dzong. Overnight in Thimphu. 

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

Thimphu is the capital of Bhutan and its governmental, religious and commercial centre.  It is nestled in the Wang Chuu river valley and is abundant in natural splendour, wildlife and culture.  Thimphu is a very unique city with an unusual mixture of modern developments alongside ancient traditions. With a population of about 100,000 people, it is perhaps the world’s only capital city without traffic lights. In fact, there are no traffic lights in the whole of the country. Here, policemen stand in decorated pavilions in the main intersections and direct traffic using hand gestures in a conscious effort to save their culture from modern influences. Every building is still decorated with Dzong-style features and Buddhism influences every part of daily life. There is a variety of cafes, bars, nightclubs and restaurants, and Thimphu is one of the few places in Bhutan to have ATM machines. Altitude: 2,320m.

Trashichhoe Dzong ('Fortress of the Glorious Religion') is the centre of government and religion, the site of the monarch’s throne room and the seat of Je Khenpo or Chief Abbot. Built in 1641 by the political and religious unifier of Bhutan, Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal was reconstructed in 1960's in a traditional Bhutanese manner, without nails or architectural plans.

Dochula Pass is located on the way from Thimphu to Punakha. The pass is a popular location as it offers a stunning 360 degree panoramic view of the Himalayan mountain range. The view is especially scenic on clear, winter days, with snowcapped mountains forming a majestic backdrop to the tranquility of the 108 chortens gracing the mountain pass. Known as the Druk Wangyal Chortens - the construction of these 108 chortens was commissioned by the eldest Queen Mother, Her Majesty Ashi Dorji Wangmo Wangchuk. The pass is also popular spiritual destination for both locals and tourists because an important temple is located at the crest of Dochula pass. 

The King's Memorial Chorten is commonly called the 'most visible religious landmark in Bhutan'. It is continuously circled by people in clockwise direction who murmur mantras and spin large red prayer wheels, as is custom in all Bhutanese religious structures. This landmark was constructed in honor of Bhutan's third king, His Majesty Jigme Dorji Wangchuk ('the father of modern Bhutan'). Completed in 1974 after his untimely death, the monument is dedicated to world peace and prosperity, as well as a memorial to the king. 

The majestic Punakha Dzong, known as the Palace of Great Happiness, used to serve as Bhutan's religious and administrative centre until the 1950s. The inside courtyards and religious statuary hint at a deep historical and spiritual tradition. It is quite large, 
measuring over 180m long by 70m wide and has a six-story, gold-domed tower. The dzong sits at the junction of the Pho chhu and Mo chhu rivers and was built in 1637 by Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal, a Tibetan Buddhist lama. Arguably the most beautiful dzong in Bhutan, it was the second to be ever built in the country. Bhutan's most treasured possession, the Rangjung ('Self-Created') Kharsapani image of Chenresig is kept here, but is closed to the public.  


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Day 12 : Thimphu

Visit Tango Goemba in the morning. Later, see the National Library, Institute for Zorig Chusum, the Textile Museum and Simply Bhutan, which is an eye-opening living museum that showcases traditional life in Bhutan. In the evening, you will drive to Buddha Point, the largest statue of Buddha in the country. Overnight in Thimphu.

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

The National Library houses the largest published book in the world. Called 'Bhutan: A Visual Odyssey Across the Last Himalayan Kingdom', it weights over 60kg and is 1.52m high and 2.13m wide. Its pages are turned only once per month. The library itself was opened in 1967 to collect and preserve ancient Dzongha and Tibetan texts. Some of the most significant document are well-labeled in English and there is even a coulourful shrine inside the building.

The Institute for Zorig Chusum, commonly known as the Painting School, offers 4- and 6- year courses where students can learn the 13 traditional Bhutanese arts and crafts. Students start with woodwork, stonework and carving, then progress onto painting, sculpting, casting, wood-turning, blacksmith-y, ornament-making, bamboo work, paper-making, tailoring and weaving. Depending on the time you visit, you may even see some of the students selling their work outside and be astounded by their skills.

The Takin Preserve is home to the Takin, Bhutan's national animal, which looks like a cross between a cow and a goat. It is only found in and around Bhutan. According to legend, the animal was created by the great Buddhist yogi, Drupa Kunley. Also known as the gnu goat, taxidermists place the Takin in a category of its own, as it is not similar enough to animals in the already established categories. 

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Day 13 : Thimphu - Paro

Today you will continue making your way to Paro. There, you will visit Ta Dzong. In the afternoon, there is an optional visit to Rinpung Dzong. Otherwise, spend your time exploring the city of Paro. Overnight in Paro. 

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

Paro is the second largest town in Bhutan although small in size and population. Its main street is lined with buildings richly decorated in traditional architecture that house a scattering of shops and restaurants. Paro is an ideal base for exploring the surrounding attractions, such as Taktsang Monastery (Tiger's Nest). After Bumthang, the valley is amongst the most beautiful in Bhutan. Altitude: 2,280m.

The Ta Dzong was originally built to be a watchtower, but it now houses the National Museum. Its extensive collection includes antique thangkha paintings, textiles, weapons, armour, household objects and a rich assortment of natural and historic artifacts.

The Rinpung Dzong, which means 'Fortress of the Heap of Jewels', has a long and fascinating history. Fine wall paintings line the wooden galleries of the inner courtyard, illustrating Buddhist traditions and knowledge.

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Day 14 : Paro

In the early morning, leave for the spectacular Taktshang Monastery (Tiger's Nest), which is a strenuous 2 - 2.5 hour walk uphill (you can ride a donkey up to the halfway point). Spend up to an hour visiting the monastery, then walk back down. 

After lunch, explore the ruins of the Drukgyal Dzong and see the 7th century Kyichu Lhakhang. The building of this temple marks the introduction of Buddhism in Bhutan and its inner sanctuary is the oldest in Bhutan. Overnight in Paro.

Meal plan: Breakfast, lunch & dinner

Also known as the Tiger’s Nest, the Taktshang Monastery is perhaps the most famous of Bhutan’s monasteries and is perched precariously on the side of a cliff, 900m above the Paro Valley. It is said that Guru Rinpoche, the founder of Tibetan Buddhism and the Buddha of our time, came here on the back of a tigress to meditate, hence the name. This site has been recognised as a most sacred place and was even visited by the Tibetan Buddhist Lama, Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal, in 1646. All Bhutanese people visit this monastery at least once in their lifetime. On 19 April 1998, a fire severely damaged the main structure of building, but it has now been restored to its original splendour. 

The hike to the monastery is a 2-2.5 hour strenuous walk uphill. This can be broken down into three stages and a donkey can be used to ride up to two-thirds of the way. The first stage is trekking to the 
rocky outcrop across a ravine from the monastery, which takes approximately 45 to 60 minutes. Lunch will be served here later today.  The second stage is walking from the cafeteria to the lookout opposite the monastery, which takes close to one hour. The third stage is climbing down 475 steps in the cliff face to the bottom of the ravine, crossing over a stream and waterfall and climbing up another 300 steps to the entrance of the monastery. You will spend up to an hour here and view the cave where Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal meditated. 

Cameras are not allowed inside the monastery. 


It was in the Ruins of the Drukgyal Dzong that the Bhutanese finally defeated the invading Tibetans and drove them back. The peak of Jumolhari ‘Mountain of the Goddess’ can be seen on a clear day from here (7,329 mts/24,029 ft.).

The Kyichu Lhakhang temple complex consists of three temples. The first was built in 1652 on the site of the Guru Rinpoche's meditation in the 8th century. The second was built on the site of a cave that contains a most holy rock with the imprint of the Guru's body. The third temple was built in the 1990s by Ashi Kesang, the Queen Mother of the royal family. The three temples are surrounded by a wall that is made of 108 chortens (shrines).

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Day 15 : Departure

After breakfast, you will be transferred to the airport for your flight home.  

Meal plan: Breakfast

Accommodation

Accommodation Title

All accommodation subject to availability. Final accommodation choices will be confirmed after booking.

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Menjong Hotel

Menjong Hotel is located in Samdrup Jongkar. The hotel has a simple decor and is fitted with modern fixtures and fittings. The en-suite bedrooms are spacious and comfortable, offering guests use of a satellite TV, air conditioning and free WiFi. The restaurant serves both a buffet and a la carte options, which includes local and international dishes.

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Druk Doejung

Druk Doejung is set on the hills of Trashigang, providing guests with scenic views across the surrounding landscape. The hotel is fitted with modern comforts to allow for a relaxing stay. The spacious rooms have a contemporary decor and are fitted with modern amenities, including air-conditioning and wifi. The on-site restaurants serves local dishes, along with a variety of international cuisine options.

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Wangchuk Hotel

Wangchuk Hotel is located just above Mongar town and offers beautiful views across the surrounding mountains, valleys and grassland. The bedrooms have a traditional and warm decor. They are fitted with a range of modern amenities to allow for a comfortable stay, including satellite television, wifi and air-conditioning. Guests can access the on-site spa and fitness centre, or choose to enjoy the scenic views from the patio and terrace areas.

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Village Lodge

Set amidst farmlands and a rural landscape, Village Lodge offers peaceful and basic accommodation in the centre of Bumthang Valley. Hotel services include a multi-cuisine restaurant, bar and lounge. Wi-fi is available in the hotel lobby.    

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Meri Puensum Resort

Established in 1999 and managed by the former Penlop (regional govenor) of Punakha, Meri Puensum Resort was one of the first resorts in Punakha. Rooms are simply designed with great views across the valley and come equipped with cable TV and heating. Wi-fi is available in public areas of the resort. The on-site dining option serve Bhutanese, Chinese, Continental and Indian cuisine. 

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Hotel Thimphu Tower

Hotel Thimpu is located at the heart of Thimpu and is the perfect place from which to explore the city. The hotel is near to many of Thimpu's sights, including Memorial Chorten, Tashichho Dzong and Buddah Point. Guests can enjoy scenic views from Hotel Thimpu Tower across the city, including the iconic Clock Tower Square. The tower of the hotel is itself a landmark heritage building, yet it is also equipped with modern amenities and comforts to allow for relaxing stay.

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Village Lodge

Village Lodge is surrounded by paddy fields and lush forests. It combines the simplicity of rural life with the modern amenities to allow for a comfortable stay. Both the architecture and decor within the lodge have been inspired by traditional Bhutanese culture. Guests can enjoy an authentic local experience, where they are welcomed into the kitchen to watch and learn the art of Bhutanese cuisine. 

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