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Monsters, cats & serpents of Colombia

Posted by & filed under Colombia, History & Archaeology, Travel Diary, Uncategorized.

Sarah Woods returns to the sacred lands of Colombia’s San Agustin to marvel at ancient carved monuments and troglodyte tombs etched with mythical winged monsters, wild cats and serpents.  According to a local fruit seller, San Agustin acquired its megalithic sculptures via an earth-bound alien space-ship. However, historians suggest South America’s largest group of religious monuments… Read more »

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Hagia Sophia: Where East Meets West

Posted by & filed under History & Archaeology, Turkey.

More than just a city, Istanbul marks the point where East meets West and nowhere else is this more apparent that at Hagia Sophia. For nearly 1000 years it was the largest enclosed building on earth, but what is unique about Hagia Sophia is how it carries the history of Christianity and Islam within its… Read more »

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Megalithic structures of Laos

Posted by & filed under History & Archaeology, Laos.

Considered one of the most important prehistoric sites in Southeast Asia is the Plain of Jars, located in Laos’ Xiangkhouang Province. Throughout the valleys of this area  stand groupings of ancient megalithic stone jars that date back to the Iron Age. Sculpted from an assortment of rock types such as sandstone, granite, limestone, conglomerate and… Read more »

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Mount Ararat & Khor Virap

Posted by & filed under History & Archaeology.

Now in Turkish territory, Mount Ararat is a sacred symbol for Armenians who consider themselves to be direct descendents of Noah.  This legend stems from a translation of the bible that cites Mount Ararat as the final resting place of Noah’s Ark. While many scholars have argued that the bible refers to the area and… Read more »

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The Teotihuacan Pyramids

Posted by & filed under History & Archaeology, Mexico.

The Teotihuacan Pyramids are the remains of an ancient city that was suddenly deserted by a civilisation around 500 AD. Today it is the most visited archaeological site in Mexico, yet it still remains the least understood. Re-discovered 700 years after its collapse by the Aztecs, the scale of the city impressed the Aztecs so… Read more »

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Nis: Romans and Religion

Posted by & filed under History & Archaeology, Serbia/Balkans.

Known to the ancient world as Naissus, Nis is one of the most historically important cities in Serbia and was once considered as the gateway between the East and West. The large number of different empires that this city has been subject to reflects its importance as a strategic position. Nis’ Roman history begins around… Read more »

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Legends of Bhutan

Posted by & filed under Bhutan, History & Archaeology.

High up between the peaks of the Himalayas lies Bhutan – the land of the thundering dragon. In the 12th century, during the construction of a Tibetan monastery a roll of thunder was heard; something interpreted as being the voice of a dragon. Since then, Bhutan’s national symbol has been that of a dragon. For more… Read more »

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Lucy: Re-thinking our ancestry

Posted by & filed under Ethiopia, History & Archaeology, News.

Last week marked the 41st anniversary of the discovery of ‘Lucy’, the 3.2 million year old skeleton of an early human ancestor. Named after The Beatles song ‘Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds’ which was playing on a cassette throughout the campsite, the affectionate and usable name of Lucy helps to portray the fact that… Read more »

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Colombia’s Lost City

Posted by & filed under Colombia, History & Archaeology.

Only rediscovered in the 1970s and predating Machu Picchu by 600 years, Ciudad Peridada (or ‘Lost City’) was a major settlement of the now extinct Tayrona tribe. Located in the heart of the north Colombian jungle and reached only by ascending 1,200 stone steps, the Lost City stands as the highlight for any adventurer to… Read more »

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