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Monsters, cats & serpents of Colombia

Posted by & filed under Colombia, History & Archaeology, Travel Diary, Uncategorized.

Sarah Woods returns to the sacred lands of Colombia’s San Agustin to marvel at ancient carved monuments and troglodyte tombs etched with mythical winged monsters, wild cats and serpents.  According to a local fruit seller, San Agustin acquired its megalithic sculptures via an earth-bound alien space-ship. However, historians suggest South America’s largest group of religious monuments… Read more »

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Tall Houses & Dead Houses of the Central Highlands

Posted by & filed under Travel Diary, Vietnam.

Ron Emmons encounters the unique ethnic communities of the Central Highlands in Vietnam While the ethnic minority groups of North Vietnam like the Flower Hmong and the Red Dao are renowned for their flamboyant outfits, those that live in the Central Highlands, such as the Bahnar and the Giarai (also spelled Jarai), tend to wear workaday clothes,… Read more »

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A day with the Apatani tribe in Arunachal Pradesh

Posted by & filed under India, Travel Diary, Tribes.

Vanessa Betts ventures deep into India’s remotest state to meet the Apatani tribe   For me, Arunachal Pradesh had always meant Tawang Monastery and nail-biting mountain passes, and it was only my second visit that I experienced the unique tribal culture of the central valleys. My boyfriend and I had a free afternoon in the… Read more »

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Hospitality redefined in Iran

Posted by & filed under Iran, Travel Diary.

On Andrew’s first visit to Iran in 2003, he learned that the kindness of strangers can redefine one’s idea of hospitality. I didn’t know what to expect from spending Christmas in Iran, but I wasn’t expecting to be standing by a dusty road in Khur, an oasis townin the Dasht-e Kavir desert, waiting for a bus… Read more »

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Hill Tribes of Shan State

Posted by & filed under Myanmar, Travel Diary, Tribes.

Joe Bindloss goes trekking in remote Burma to meet the Shan State hill tribes. Every country likes to describe itself as a melting pot, but in the hills around Kengtung (Kyaing Tong), in Burma’s rugged Shan state, the tag fits. The tiny villages scattered around this sleepy Buddhist outpost are home to an extraordinary mix of hill tribes, from… Read more »

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Georgia’s Christian Identity

Posted by & filed under Georgia & Caucasus.

A country that has witnessed its fair share of turmoil, Georgia lies at the crossroads between Europe and Asia. Georgia’s geographical location has meant that it has been under the control of the Greeks, Persians and Mongols. Up until the collapse of the USSR, Georgia was even known as the ‘Soviet Riviera’. Despite the constant… Read more »

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The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway

Posted by & filed under India.

Starting at an elevation of only about 100m in New Jalpaiguri and rising to around 2,200m is the Darjeeling Himalayan railway – the world’s tallest railway network. Whilst the length of this track is only 78km long, the Darjeeling Himalayan railway (fondly know as the ‘Toy Train’) is a must-do for travelers to this part… Read more »

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Marine Conservation in the Philippines

Posted by & filed under Conservation, Philippines.

With over 36,000 km of coastline, it’s not surprising that the Philippines has the world’s richest marine ecosystem. Nestled in the so called ‘coral triangle’ which is home to more than three quarters of the world’s coral species and over 2000 marine plants and animals, the Philippines truly is a diver’s paradise. Vast coral reefs,… Read more »

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Hagia Sophia: Where East Meets West

Posted by & filed under History & Archaeology, Turkey.

More than just a city, Istanbul marks the point where East meets West and nowhere else is this more apparent that at Hagia Sophia. For nearly 1000 years it was the largest enclosed building on earth, but what is unique about Hagia Sophia is how it carries the history of Christianity and Islam within its… Read more »

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